Blog

  • When you disagree with those who lead you
    Heather Day

    When You Disagree with Those Who Lead You (Part II)

    Blog | Heather Day | May 01, 2015

    Where two or three are gathered….. there’s sure to be conflict.

    Conflict is not inherently bad.  As I’ve heard it said before, if two leaders agree on everything, one of them is probably not needed. Whether it’s within a church, a business, or even (perhaps especially!) a marriage, strength is found when we value and explore alternate viewpoints. 

  • Get up and try again

    Blog | April 16, 2015

    All of us fail. Absolutely no one is exempt from failure.

    It’s also true that while we excuse or spiritualize our own shortcomings, we look at and judge the failures of others with a much more critical spirit.

    As leaders, we have an incredible opportunity to influence and even empower others by sharing moments of failure. Great failures are, after all, part of many great success stories.

  • Megan Pacheco

    Picture Perfect Failure: Lessons from Kodak

    Blog | Megan Pacheco | April 09, 2015

    Ah, the “Kodak moments” of life… Many still remember the photography company’s commercials emphasizing the emotional connection people felt as they traveled to pick up those family pictures at the processing store. Most likely somewhere on your bookshelf, there’s a dusty photo album tucked away from “way back when” full of hard prints shot on Kodak film.

  • Megan Pacheco

    Making Room for Interruptions

    Blog | Megan Pacheco | April 02, 2015

    When was the last time you were interrupted?

    Was it at work by an employee who’s not on your ”favorite list”? Was it at home by one of your children or your spouse while you were trying to finish a project? Was it at the store by an acquaintance with whom you really had no desire to chitchat? Or maybe it was a detour that interrupted an otherwise well-planned trip.

    Life’s interruptions are frequent, and we tend to look at them as unnecessary, bothersome, annoying and counterproductive.

  • Megan Pacheco

    Desire for Control is Killing Your Organization

    Blog | Megan Pacheco | March 26, 2015

    Letting go is never easy.

    Many parents, for example, find it difficult to loosen the reins of control on their growing children — even in the face of startling statistics on the damage inflicted by controlling parents.

    As adults, 96% of people who had controlling parents worry and ruminate over confrontations. Close to 91% are extra sensitive to criticism, while 82% become perfectionists who are rarely satisfied with themselves.

  • Phyllis

    Transformed Leader, Transformed Community

    Blog | Phyllis Hennecy Hendry | March 20, 2015

    Earlier this month, I was asked by Dick Kunnert, a Lead Like Jesus Master Trainer, to speak to a wonderful group of pastors in Rockford, Illinois. Representing multiple congregations from a variety of denominations, this group is united around one mission to “Transform Rockford.”

    The vision of Transform Rockford is inspiring. They aspire to offer a superior quality of life for every resident, transforming the community from within by embracing their diversity, fostering a culture of unity, interconnection, inclusion, respect and generosity. 

  • The appropriate and healthy use of authority by a leader is a beautiful thing.  One of my favorite stories about the concept and use of authority by a leader is found in both Matthew 8 and Luke 7.  In this story, a Centurion approaches Jesus and initiates a dialogue, included in the dialogue is the confirmation of the Centurion’s keen understanding about the use of authority.  This Roman Centurion was likely very diligent with the military business of the Roman Army, since he was a key army leader at the “middle management level.”  He commanded a “century”, which consisted of about 100 Roma

  • Honesty and Leadership

    Blog | March 20, 2015

    Honesty is the single most important “building block” in the leader-follower relationship.  To many people, honesty is the same as sincerity, truthfulness, integrity, frankness, candor, and openness.  Though some leaders don’t consciously realize it, honesty includes not only telling the truth, but also leaving the right impression.  Albert Einstein said, “Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters.”

  • Managing Disagreement and Leadership

    Blog | Frank Bragg | March 20, 2015

    For many years, I’ve coached men and women on the importance of this leadership topic.  When little “d” (small disagreement) becomes big “D” (BIG DISAGREEMENT), then things have moved to real conflict, and the successful management of a “disagreement” has been lost.  In fact, the management of that “disagreement” has failed, if things have moved into conflict.

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